Category: Ovarian cancer research

Ovarian cancer research and support for Ovarian cancer from Talcum Powder at the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline.

Fallopian Tube Cancer Connection To Ovarian Cancer

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is always searching  for helpful articles  for our readers. With so much news about Talcum Powder lawsuits we have all been wondering about the link between use of talcum powder and a diagnosis of fallopian tube cancer and ovarian cancer. There have been numerous lawsuits in the news. We are sharing this with our readers.

Evidence Points to Fallopian-tube Origins of Ovarian Cancer

It has been noted in many studies that the talc from the powder can travel thru the fallopian tubes and end up in the ovaries resulting in the dreaded disease. But, what is the link between fallopian tube cancer and ovarian cancer? The following article explores the question

Most cases of high-grade serous cancer (HSGC) ― the most lethal form of ovarian cancer ― arise from the fallopian tubes rather than the ovaries, concludes a literature review published in the April issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

“There has been a major breakthrough in our understanding of the origin of ovarian cancer with the identification of the fallopian tubes as the major source of the cancer,” commented first author Mary Daly, MD, head of the Genetics Risk Assessment Division of Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She even suggested that in the future, ovarian cancer may be described as fallopian tube cancer.

“This raises the possibility of altering our risk-reducing surgery approach, specifically, by removing the fallopian tubes first, while a woman is still premenopausal, and then removing the ovaries at the time of onset of menopause,” Dr Daly explained. “This would spare women the side effects and long-term health risks associated with early surgical menopause.”

For women with hereditary risk for ovarian cancer, such as those with BRCA1/2 mutations, the standard of care has been removal of both ovaries and fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingo- oopherectomy [BSO]). Although this procedure reduces the risk for ovarian cancer, it can affect quality of life, precipitate early menopause, cause sexual dysfunction, and contribute to increased risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and all-cause mortality.
Because HSGC constitutes the most common form of ovarian cancer among women with high genetic risk, the new approach (bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention [BSOR]) could also have a “large impact” on ovarian cancer mortality, Dr Daly and colleagues write in the article.

BSOR could also reduce ovarian cancer risk in women at average risk for ovarian cancer who are undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions, such as fibroids. About 600,000 women undergo hysterectomies in the United States each year. Fifteen percent of women who have had a hysterectomy develop ovarian cancer, according to background information in the article.

However, in a related editorial, Mark Greene, MD, and Phuong Mai, MD, from the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute, in Bethesda, Maryland, state, “in our view, BSOR is an investigational procedure that should not be routinely implemented in high-risk women until its risks and benefits are more clearly defined.”

The editorialists call for more research on the outcomes of such surgery, including impact on quality of life and on ovarian function. But they are pleased to see research moving the field forward. Recalling that in the past, when ovaries were removed prophylactically, the fallopian tubes were often left behind, they note that the current standard is to remove both ovaries and fallopian tubes. This latest research points to the importance of the fallopian tubes in ovarian carcinogenesis and is providing “invaluable etiologic and clinical leads that promise to refine and improve both the prevention and management of ovarian cancer,” they write.

If you used Talcum powder and now have a cancer diagnosis contact us today

Alternatives To Talcum Powder

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues to get calls on a daily basis from women with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer seeking a Talcum Powder lawyer. The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline offers the latest news on Talcum Powder and the Talc Lawsuits. We found this article online about alternatives to talcum powder and think it will be helpful to our readers.

What Are The Alternatives To Talcum Powder?

Not all medical professionals agree that a link between baby powder and ovarian cancer exists.
The recent headlines about baby powder and its connection to ovarian cancer may raise more questions than answers. In February, a Missouri court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million in damages to the family of Jackie Fox, a woman who died of ovarian cancer. The lawsuit said her death was linked to her 50-year daily habit of applying baby powder. But Johnson & Johnson insisted a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven.

“The verdict goes against decades of sound science proving the safety of talc as a cosmetic ingredient in multiple products, and while we sympathize with the family of the plaintiff, we strongly disagree with the outcome,” a spokesman for the company said in a statement.

Prosecutors say Johnson & Johnson knew about the risk since the early 1980s and did not protect its customers. In fact, the first study conducted on talc powder use on female genitalia found a 92 percent increased risk for ovarian cancer with women who reported genital talc use. But still, other doctors disagree. “Several decades of medical research do not support the hypothesis that use of talcum powder causes ovarian cancer,” said Dr. Hal Lawrence, chief executive officer of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

If all this back-and-forth has you questioning your baby powder usage, fear not. There are some safe alternatives to talc powder:

Cornstarch. Found in the baking aisle of your local grocery store, cornstarch is a great natural alternative to talc. The consistency is exactly the same, so it’ll help soak up wetness just as well. Cornstarch is derived from the endosperm of a corn kernel and is often used to help thicken sauces.

Arrowroot starch or tapioca starch. Both staples in a paleo baker’s kitchen, these starches are all-natural alternatives to talc. Arrowroot is derived from several tropical South American plants. Tapioca starch is derived from the crushed-up pulp of the South American cassava plant, a woody shrub. Both are used in paleo recipes as alternatives to flour and cornstarch. If you’re using it to on your baby’s sore bottom, try this recipe with some extra ingredients to help soothe.

Baking soda. You thought sodium bicarbonate, otherwise known as baking soda, only had 100 uses. Well, here’s one more: This common pantry item can be used in place of baby powder. Some people even use it as deodorant, applying some to their underarms each morning. It can also deodorize the air. As a matter of fact, I keep one container in my pantry, one under my sink, one in my laundry room and one in the bathroom.

Oat flour. Try this if you’re looking for a slightly coarser powder than the ones mentioned above.

Commercial baby powder alternatives. These products combine the items listed above with essential oils, so the powder smells pretty nice. Just to name a few:

Burt’s Bee’s Baby Dusting Powder
Honeybee Gardens Deodorant Powder
The Honest Company Organic Baby Powder
Nature’s Baby Dusting Powder
Here’s one last reason to consider the all-natural route: Talc is poisonous when inhaled or swallowed. It can cause breathing problems, which is why the American Academy of Pediatrics urges caution when it comes to using talc powder on babies.

If you or a loved one has a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and you or they have used Talcum Powder to dry off around the genital areas for over five years it would be in your best interest to call the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline and speak to one of our talcum powder lawyers

Liquid Biopsies For Earlier Ovarian Cancer Tracking

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues in one of  it’s missions  to offer the latest news regarding ovarian cancer. We receive dozens of calls on a daily basis from women who feel their use of Talcum Powder products has resulted in their ovarian cancer diagnosis. We continue to connect women with qualified talcum powder ovarian cancer lawyers and offer news we feel will be helpful to these women.

We found this latest news online and hope it will be helpful to our followers.

There is new news about  liquid biopsies offering  hope for earlier treatment and  better tracking of ovarian cancer.

A promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer has been identified by researchers a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. New research finds liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears.

If you have used Talcum Powder products and suspect an ovarian cancer this may be an option to check out with your doctor.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have found a promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer — a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. New research from George Vasmatzis, Ph.D., of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic, finds liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears. That could lead to earlier intervention and more effective, individualized treatment. Dr. Vasmatzis’ research on the “Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-free DNA From Ovarian Cancers” is published in the July 20 edition of Scientific Reports.

“With liquid biopsies, we don’t have to wait for tumor growth to get a DNA sample,” says Dr. Vasmatzis. “This important discovery makes it possible for us detect recurrence of the disease earlier than other diagnostic methods. We can repeat liquid biopsies to monitor the progression of the cancer. That gives hope of a better treatment plan over time.”

The study was done on 10 patients in advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Blood was drawn before and after surgery. Investigators compared DNA from the liquid blood biopsies to DNA tissue samples from the tumor, using mate-pair sequencing — an inexpensive whole exome sequencing that can reveal genetic changes that contribute to tumor growth.

“In this study, the blood drawn before and after surgery and the surgical tissue was used to identify DNA fragments with abnormal junctions that can only be seen in this patient’s tumor DNA,” explains Dr. Vasmatzis. “Next-generation mate-pair sequencing was used to identify specific DNA changes of the tumor to create an individualized monitoring panel for liquid biopsy. This allows us to shape treatment to the individual patient rather than using a standard treatment that may not work for everyone.”

When post-surgery DNA matched that of the tumor, patients were later found to have had a recurrence of ovarian cancer. However, when the post-surgery DNA did not match the DNA of the tumor, patients were found to be in remission.

Ovarian cancer has one of the highest death rates of all gynecological cancers, because the tumor often cannot be detected until the late stages. Most patients go into remission after initial treatment, but the tumor returns 75 percent of the time. The next stage of ovarian cancer that develops typically does not respond to chemotherapy. More than 21,000 women in the U.S. were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and 14,000 women died of the disease in 2015.

We wonder if the 1000’s of women using talcum powder products and the latest research on the link between talcum powder use and ovarian cancer has anything to do with such huge numbers. Many women have used talcum powder for years, especially in the Afro American and Hispanic community. J & J marketed their products to these women and the idea of smelling fresh and clean became a girlfriend to girlfriend positive  in smelling  “sweet and fresh like  Talcum Powder today.”

Latest Research on Ovarian Cancer

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is more then just a network of experienced Talcum Powder Lawsuit Attorneys. We offer ovarian cancer resources and updates that are found online. Below you will find some of the latest research on ovarian cancer. It is now known, that the manufacturers knew that there was a potential link between ovarian cancer and the use of Talcum Powder and Baby Powder. The jury knew it when they gave the family of a talcum powder- ovarian cancer victim $72 million.

We found this page on the latest research and offer it to our followers. We hope this helps.

Ovarian Cancer – Latest Research
Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 04/2015

Doctors are working to learn more about ovarian cancer, ways to prevent it, how to best treat it, and how to provide the best care to people diagnosed with this disease. The following areas of research may include new options for patients through clinical trials. Always talk with your doctor about the diagnostic and treatment options best for you.

Screening For Ovarian Cancer

There are no currently effective screening methods for the general population. A screening method that estimates a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer by using her age and the results of a yearly CA-125 blood test holds promise for detecting early-stage ovarian cancer. An international study is looking into the role of serial CA-125 screening for ovarian cancer. As explained in Diagnosis, CA-125 is a substance called a tumor marker that is found in higher levels in women with ovarian cancer.

In 2012, the U.S Preventative Services Task Force released a statement saying that for the general population of women with no symptoms, screening for ovarian cancer is not helpful and may lead to harm. However, women at high risk for ovarian cancer due to family history or with a BRCA mutation(s) (see Risk Factors) are recommended to have screening with CA-125 blood tests and transvaginal ultrasound. This approach has not been proven to improve survival or detect cancers at an earlier and more curable stage.

Targeted Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

Targeted therapy is a treatment that targets the cancer’s specific genes, proteins, or the tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival.

Some targeted therapy is directed towards specific genes that might be found with abnormalities in certain types of epithelial ovarian cancer. For this purpose, ovarian cancer is divided into two groups:  type I and type II.  Type II cancers are the more typical high grade serous cancers, for which standard chemotherapy has been most effective. These tumors typically are diagnosed at later stages and have mutations in TP53 and BRCA genes in the tumor.  Other mutations are rarely seen.

The BRCA mutation, even if only found in the tumor and not in the blood, may increase the effectiveness of a certain classes of drugs such as PARP inhibitors (see below).  Type I tumors include the more rare types of ovarian cancer including low grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, and mucinous cancers.  These tumors have a variety of mutations including KRAS, BRAF, PI3KCA and PTEN, which have implications for targeted treatment. Clinical trials in these groups are ongoing.

Anti-Angiogenesis Inhibitors For Ovarian Cancer

Drugs called anti-angiogenesis inhibitors block the action of a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These drugs have been shown to increase the cancer’s response to treatment and delay the time it takes for the cancer to return. VEGF promotes angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels. Because a tumor needs nutrients delivered by blood vessels to grow and spread, the goal of anti-angiogensis therapies is to “starve” the tumor. Bevacizumab (Avastin), an antibody which binds VEGF and prevents it from being active, has been shown to be effective in ovarian cancer.  FDA approval was recently given in the United States for its use in combination with selected chemotherapy for patients with platinum resistant recurrence.
PARP Inhibitors For Ovarian Cancer

Another class of drugs, called PARP inhibitors, are being evaluated for ovarian cancer.  These drugs act on DNA repair in cancer cells, making it difficult for them to replicate.  The BRCA genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) are also normally involved in DNA repair, and a mutation in these genes interfere with this pathway function.  PARP inhibitors make it particularly difficult for cells that otherwise have a BRCA mutation to grow and divide.

The PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) has received FDA approval in the United States for recurrent disease in patients who have the inherited BRCA mutation and who have received three or more lines of chemotherapy.  In the supporting study of 137 patients with a BRCA mutation, 34% of patients experienced shrinkage in tumor for an average of 7.9 months. A very small number of patients developed secondary hematologic (blood) cancers after use of these drugs. Studies are currently underway with other PARP inhibitors, which do not all require the inherited BRCA mutation. These are being tested to see if they can keep the cancer from coming back after chemotherapy. The potential benefits and risks of PARP therapy should be discussed with your doctor.
Many other new targeted treatments are also now in clinical trials. Increasingly, doctors are learning about each patient’s individual tumor’s biology through direct molecular testing. This information may be useful in matching patients with a clinical trial for a specific targeted therapy.  Learn more about the basics of targeted therapy.

Immunotherapy For Ovarian Cancer

Immunotherapy is usually designed to boost the body’s natural defenses to fight the cancer. It uses materials made either by the body or in a laboratory to bolster, target, or restore immune system function. Researchers are currently examining whether drugs called checkpoint inhibitors may boost the immune system’s ability to destroy cancer cells.  Examples of these drugs target CTLA4 or PD-1 and have recently been shown to cause shrinkage in other cancer types such as melanoma, as well as having some activity in patients with ovarian cancer.

Cancer vaccines are another type of immunotherapy currently being tested for ovarian cancer.  In addition, some approaches called “adoptive cell therapy” take killer T cells found as part of the immune system in an individual patient and grow them in the laboratory, train them to attack certain targets such as MUC 16 (CA125) that is found on any ovarian cancer cells, and them give them back intravenously to the patient.  This approach has been tried in patients with hematologic cancers using other targets with some early success, and clinical trials are now opening for ovarian cancer.  Learn more about the basics of immunotherapy.

Hormone Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

Research is underway about the role of estrogen, androgens, and other hormones in ovarian cancer treatment. For treatment of recurrent or later-stage ovarian cancer,  the use of tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamax), aromatase inhibitors, and enzalutamide (Xtandi), a blocker of the androgen receptor, is being considered.

Gene Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

One new area of research is discovering how damaged genes in ovarian cancer cells can be corrected or replaced. Researchers are studying the use of specially designed viruses that carry normal genes into the core of cancer cells and then replace the defective genes with the functional ones.

Supportive Care For Ovarian Cancer

Clinical trials are underway to find better ways of reducing symptoms and side effects of current ovarian cancer treatments, in order to improve a woman’s comfort and quality of life.

We will continue to search the net for ovarian cancer  information to help our clients. Our goal is to offer information that may help