Tag: Ovarian cancer treatment

FDA Approves New Ovarian Cancer Drug

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline has qualified Baby Powder and Shower To Shower lawyers for women who feel their ovarian cancer diagnosis is due to ” dusting Off ” for years with talcum powder products.  The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues to keep woman and families updated on the talcum Powder Lawsuit latest news and any new research or news pertaining to ovarian cancer that we think will be helpful to our readers.

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FRIDAY, Dec. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug to treat advanced ovarian cancer, along with a test to identify patients eligible to receive the drug.

Lynparza (olaparib) belongs to a new class of drugs called poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. The drug is for women who have already received extensive treatment for advanced ovarian cancer associated with defective BRCA genes, according to an FDA news release issued Friday.

“Today’s approval constitutes the first of a new class of drugs for treating ovarian cancer,” Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in the news release.

“Lynparza is approved for patients with specific abnormalities in the BRCA gene and is an example of how a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease can lead to targeted, more personalized treatment,” he said.

Approval of the AstraZeneca drug was based on a clinical trial of almost 140 women with BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer. Thirty-four percent of the patients on the drug had partial shrinkage or complete disappearance of their tumors for an average of eight months, the FDA reported.

Nausea, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, decreased appetite, joint and muscle pain, and cold-like symptoms were common side effects of the drug. More serious side effects included lung inflammation; the bone marrow cancer acute myeloid leukemia; and myelodysplastic syndrome, a condition where the bone marrow is unable to produce enough functioning blood cells, the FDA said.

Women must undergo a genetic test to confirm BRCA gene mutations before they can be treated with Lynparza. The test to confirm those genes was approved by the FDA in conjunction with the drug.

BRCA genes play a role in repairing damaged DNA. Normally, they work to suppress tumor growth. Women with mutations that cause defective BRCA genes have an increased risk for ovarian and breast cancer. It’s believed that 10 to 15 percent of all ovarian cancer is associated with these mutations, the FDA said.

In 2014, nearly 22,000 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer and more than 14,000 will die from the disease, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

If you or a loved one has a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and has used talcum powder products for years contact the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline.

Latest Research on Ovarian Cancer

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is more then just a network of experienced Talcum Powder Lawsuit Attorneys. We offer ovarian cancer resources and updates that are found online. Below you will find some of the latest research on ovarian cancer. It is now known, that the manufacturers knew that there was a potential link between ovarian cancer and the use of Talcum Powder and Baby Powder. The jury knew it when they gave the family of a talcum powder- ovarian cancer victim $72 million.

We found this page on the latest research and offer it to our followers. We hope this helps.

Ovarian Cancer – Latest Research
Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 04/2015

Doctors are working to learn more about ovarian cancer, ways to prevent it, how to best treat it, and how to provide the best care to people diagnosed with this disease. The following areas of research may include new options for patients through clinical trials. Always talk with your doctor about the diagnostic and treatment options best for you.

Screening For Ovarian Cancer

There are no currently effective screening methods for the general population. A screening method that estimates a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer by using her age and the results of a yearly CA-125 blood test holds promise for detecting early-stage ovarian cancer. An international study is looking into the role of serial CA-125 screening for ovarian cancer. As explained in Diagnosis, CA-125 is a substance called a tumor marker that is found in higher levels in women with ovarian cancer.

In 2012, the U.S Preventative Services Task Force released a statement saying that for the general population of women with no symptoms, screening for ovarian cancer is not helpful and may lead to harm. However, women at high risk for ovarian cancer due to family history or with a BRCA mutation(s) (see Risk Factors) are recommended to have screening with CA-125 blood tests and transvaginal ultrasound. This approach has not been proven to improve survival or detect cancers at an earlier and more curable stage.

Targeted Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

Targeted therapy is a treatment that targets the cancer’s specific genes, proteins, or the tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival.

Some targeted therapy is directed towards specific genes that might be found with abnormalities in certain types of epithelial ovarian cancer. For this purpose, ovarian cancer is divided into two groups:  type I and type II.  Type II cancers are the more typical high grade serous cancers, for which standard chemotherapy has been most effective. These tumors typically are diagnosed at later stages and have mutations in TP53 and BRCA genes in the tumor.  Other mutations are rarely seen.

The BRCA mutation, even if only found in the tumor and not in the blood, may increase the effectiveness of a certain classes of drugs such as PARP inhibitors (see below).  Type I tumors include the more rare types of ovarian cancer including low grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, and mucinous cancers.  These tumors have a variety of mutations including KRAS, BRAF, PI3KCA and PTEN, which have implications for targeted treatment. Clinical trials in these groups are ongoing.

Anti-Angiogenesis Inhibitors For Ovarian Cancer

Drugs called anti-angiogenesis inhibitors block the action of a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These drugs have been shown to increase the cancer’s response to treatment and delay the time it takes for the cancer to return. VEGF promotes angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels. Because a tumor needs nutrients delivered by blood vessels to grow and spread, the goal of anti-angiogensis therapies is to “starve” the tumor. Bevacizumab (Avastin), an antibody which binds VEGF and prevents it from being active, has been shown to be effective in ovarian cancer.  FDA approval was recently given in the United States for its use in combination with selected chemotherapy for patients with platinum resistant recurrence.
PARP Inhibitors For Ovarian Cancer

Another class of drugs, called PARP inhibitors, are being evaluated for ovarian cancer.  These drugs act on DNA repair in cancer cells, making it difficult for them to replicate.  The BRCA genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) are also normally involved in DNA repair, and a mutation in these genes interfere with this pathway function.  PARP inhibitors make it particularly difficult for cells that otherwise have a BRCA mutation to grow and divide.

The PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) has received FDA approval in the United States for recurrent disease in patients who have the inherited BRCA mutation and who have received three or more lines of chemotherapy.  In the supporting study of 137 patients with a BRCA mutation, 34% of patients experienced shrinkage in tumor for an average of 7.9 months. A very small number of patients developed secondary hematologic (blood) cancers after use of these drugs. Studies are currently underway with other PARP inhibitors, which do not all require the inherited BRCA mutation. These are being tested to see if they can keep the cancer from coming back after chemotherapy. The potential benefits and risks of PARP therapy should be discussed with your doctor.
Many other new targeted treatments are also now in clinical trials. Increasingly, doctors are learning about each patient’s individual tumor’s biology through direct molecular testing. This information may be useful in matching patients with a clinical trial for a specific targeted therapy.  Learn more about the basics of targeted therapy.

Immunotherapy For Ovarian Cancer

Immunotherapy is usually designed to boost the body’s natural defenses to fight the cancer. It uses materials made either by the body or in a laboratory to bolster, target, or restore immune system function. Researchers are currently examining whether drugs called checkpoint inhibitors may boost the immune system’s ability to destroy cancer cells.  Examples of these drugs target CTLA4 or PD-1 and have recently been shown to cause shrinkage in other cancer types such as melanoma, as well as having some activity in patients with ovarian cancer.

Cancer vaccines are another type of immunotherapy currently being tested for ovarian cancer.  In addition, some approaches called “adoptive cell therapy” take killer T cells found as part of the immune system in an individual patient and grow them in the laboratory, train them to attack certain targets such as MUC 16 (CA125) that is found on any ovarian cancer cells, and them give them back intravenously to the patient.  This approach has been tried in patients with hematologic cancers using other targets with some early success, and clinical trials are now opening for ovarian cancer.  Learn more about the basics of immunotherapy.

Hormone Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

Research is underway about the role of estrogen, androgens, and other hormones in ovarian cancer treatment. For treatment of recurrent or later-stage ovarian cancer,  the use of tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamax), aromatase inhibitors, and enzalutamide (Xtandi), a blocker of the androgen receptor, is being considered.

Gene Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

One new area of research is discovering how damaged genes in ovarian cancer cells can be corrected or replaced. Researchers are studying the use of specially designed viruses that carry normal genes into the core of cancer cells and then replace the defective genes with the functional ones.

Supportive Care For Ovarian Cancer

Clinical trials are underway to find better ways of reducing symptoms and side effects of current ovarian cancer treatments, in order to improve a woman’s comfort and quality of life.

We will continue to search the net for ovarian cancer  information to help our clients. Our goal is to offer information that may help

 

Possible New Aggressive Ovarian Cancer Treatment In The News

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline offers resources, new ovarian cancer treatment news, updates on the Talcum Powder lawsuits, and qualified experienced Talcum Powder lawsuit attorneys.

We found this article on new Ovarian cancer treatment studies and offer it to our readers. A new study points to  MicroRNA molecule’s role in cancer gene expression to be more important than previously thought
Date:
May 5, 2016
Source:
University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center
Summary:
Small, non-coding molecules called microRNAs are known to play an important role in cancer development. Researchers now have shown their significance is greater than previously thought, a finding that could lead to new therapeutic approaches for the most common and deadly form of ovarian cancer.

 The New Facts
Small, non-coding molecules called microRNAs are known to play an important role in cancer development. Researchers now have shown their significance is greater than previously thought, a finding that could lead to new therapeutic approaches for the most common and deadly form of ovarian cancer.

The study results, published in the May 5, 2016 online issue of Cell Reports, were reported by a team led by Gordon Mills, Ph.D., chair of Systems Biology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“MicroRNAs appear to have evolved to regulate cellular functions through having many different targets, and were thought to function mainly through down regulating the levels or functions of messenger RNA,” said Mills. “Remarkably, this study shows that microRNAs can also up regulate the expression of key cancer genes directly. This suggests that the mechanisms by which microRNAs regulate cellular function are much broader than was generally accepted.”

The team, using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, zeroed in on the biochemical interplay between a transcription factor, STAT3, which has been associated with poor outcome in ovarian cancer patients when present in high levels, and a microRNA called miR551b. This little-studied microRNA now has been shown to impact STAT3 protein levels, contributing to resistance to cell death and increased proliferation of cancer cells both in vivo and in vitro. Mills believes this points to miR551b as a “promising candidate biomarker and therapeutic target.”

“The study supports the concept that targeting miR551b expression could block STAT3 activity, and prove useful for treating ovarian cancers,” said Mills. “We believe these findings warrant further evaluation of anti-miR therapies.”

To explore the potential of miR551b as a therapeutic target, Mills’ team treated mice with an anti-miR551b therapy, twice a week for a month and observed markedly decreased tumor growth.

“Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of anti-miR551b in treating ovarian cancers with high levels of miR551b,” said Mills. “Future studies will need to examine the activity of combination therapy of anti-miR551b with other therapeutic interventions.”

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