Tag: ovarian cancer

Fallopian Tube Cancer Connection To Ovarian Cancer

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is always searching  for helpful articles  for our readers. With so much news about Talcum Powder lawsuits we have all been wondering about the link between use of talcum powder and a diagnosis of fallopian tube cancer and ovarian cancer. There have been numerous lawsuits in the news. We are sharing this with our readers.

Evidence Points to Fallopian-tube Origins of Ovarian Cancer

It has been noted in many studies that the talc from the powder can travel thru the fallopian tubes and end up in the ovaries resulting in the dreaded disease. But, what is the link between fallopian tube cancer and ovarian cancer? The following article explores the question

Most cases of high-grade serous cancer (HSGC) ― the most lethal form of ovarian cancer ― arise from the fallopian tubes rather than the ovaries, concludes a literature review published in the April issue of Cancer Prevention Research.

“There has been a major breakthrough in our understanding of the origin of ovarian cancer with the identification of the fallopian tubes as the major source of the cancer,” commented first author Mary Daly, MD, head of the Genetics Risk Assessment Division of Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She even suggested that in the future, ovarian cancer may be described as fallopian tube cancer.

“This raises the possibility of altering our risk-reducing surgery approach, specifically, by removing the fallopian tubes first, while a woman is still premenopausal, and then removing the ovaries at the time of onset of menopause,” Dr Daly explained. “This would spare women the side effects and long-term health risks associated with early surgical menopause.”

For women with hereditary risk for ovarian cancer, such as those with BRCA1/2 mutations, the standard of care has been removal of both ovaries and fallopian tubes (bilateral salpingo- oopherectomy [BSO]). Although this procedure reduces the risk for ovarian cancer, it can affect quality of life, precipitate early menopause, cause sexual dysfunction, and contribute to increased risk for cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and all-cause mortality.
Because HSGC constitutes the most common form of ovarian cancer among women with high genetic risk, the new approach (bilateral salpingectomy with ovarian retention [BSOR]) could also have a “large impact” on ovarian cancer mortality, Dr Daly and colleagues write in the article.

BSOR could also reduce ovarian cancer risk in women at average risk for ovarian cancer who are undergoing hysterectomy for benign conditions, such as fibroids. About 600,000 women undergo hysterectomies in the United States each year. Fifteen percent of women who have had a hysterectomy develop ovarian cancer, according to background information in the article.

However, in a related editorial, Mark Greene, MD, and Phuong Mai, MD, from the Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics at the National Cancer Institute, in Bethesda, Maryland, state, “in our view, BSOR is an investigational procedure that should not be routinely implemented in high-risk women until its risks and benefits are more clearly defined.”

The editorialists call for more research on the outcomes of such surgery, including impact on quality of life and on ovarian function. But they are pleased to see research moving the field forward. Recalling that in the past, when ovaries were removed prophylactically, the fallopian tubes were often left behind, they note that the current standard is to remove both ovaries and fallopian tubes. This latest research points to the importance of the fallopian tubes in ovarian carcinogenesis and is providing “invaluable etiologic and clinical leads that promise to refine and improve both the prevention and management of ovarian cancer,” they write.

If you used Talcum powder and now have a cancer diagnosis contact us today

Talcum Powder Lawyers Win | Talc Lawsuit Alert

Talcum Powder Lawyers Win For Ovarian Cancer Victim

J&J  Has Been Ordered to Pay $417 Million

(Reuters) – A California jury on Monday ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $417 million to a woman who claimed she developed ovarian cancer after using the company’s talc-based products like Johnson’s Baby Powder for feminine hygiene.
The Los Angeles Superior Court jury’s verdict in favor of California resident Eva Echeverria was the largest yet in lawsuits alleging J&J failed to adequately warn consumers about the cancer risks of its talc-based products.
“We are grateful for the jury’s verdict on this matter and that Eva Echeverria was able to have her day in court,” Mark Robinson, her lawyer, said in a statement.
The verdict included $70 million in compensatory damages and $347 million in punitive damages. It was a major setback for J&J, which faces 4,800 similar claims nationally and has been hit with over $300 million in verdicts by juries in Missouri.
“We will appeal today’s verdict because we are guided by the science, which supports the safety of Johnson’s Baby Powder,” J&J said.
Echeverria’s lawsuit was the first out of hundreds of California talc cases to go to trial.
The 63-year-old claimed she developed terminal ovarian cancer after decades of using J&J’s products. Her lawyers argued J&J encouraged women to use its products despite knowing of studies linking ovarian cancer to genital talc use.
J&J’s lawyers countered that studies and federal agencies have not found that talc products are carcinogenic.
The trial follows five prior ones in Missouri state court, where many lawsuits are pending.
J&J lost four of those trials and, along with a talc supplier, has been hit with $307 million in verdicts. Before Monday, the largest verdict was for $110 million.
The Missouri cases, which have largely been brought by out-of-state plaintiffs, have faced jurisdictional questions after the U.S. Supreme Court issued a ruling in June that limited where personal injury lawsuits can be filed.
In a decision in a case involving Bristol-Myers Squibb Co, the Supreme Court said state courts cannot hear claims against companies that are not based in the state when the alleged injuries did not occur there.
The ruling prompted a St. Louis judge, at New Jersey-based J&J’s urging, to declare a mistrial in the talc case already underway.
The judge has nonetheless left the door open for the plaintiffs to argue they still have jurisdiction based on a Missouri-based bottler J&J used to package its products.
The case is Echeverria et al v. Johnson & Johnson, Los Angeles Superior Court, No. BC628228.
(Reporting by Nate Raymond in Boston; Editing by Matthew Lewis and Paul Simao)

If you or a loved one used  Johnson and Johnson Talcum Powder  products for over five years on or near the genital area and now have a diagnosis of ovarian cancer or fallopian tube cancer contact The Talcum Powder Lawyer Helpline today.

Talcum Powder Cancer Lawsuits Continue

Johnson and Johnson Facing Potentially  1000’s Of Ovarian Cancer Lawsuits

Johnson and Johnson won a  fourth talcum powder lawsuit but, had  three judgements of $72 million, $70 million and $55 million. Our lawyers have filed dozens of talcum powder lawsuits  on behalf of women who claim they got  ovarian cancer from Johnson & Johnson’s talcum based powders. A fifth talcum baby powder lawsuit was heard in the 22nd Circuit Court in St. Louis, Missouri, on April 10th. The jury heard the case of Lois Slemp, who alleges that she developed ovarian cancer as a result of long term use of talc powder found in feminine hygiene products made by Johnson & Johnson (J&J).

A California state court judge will convene a 5-day “Sargon” hearing, California’s equivalent of a Daubert proceeding, to determine the admissibility of expert witness testimony. This could be as significant as a trial itself, after a New Jersey state court judge in October nixed testimony from two key expert witnesses for the plaintiff, scuttling what was set to the first talcum powder trial in the state. That decision remains on appeal.

Depending on the outcome of the June hearing, a bellwether trial is scheduled for July in Los Angeles, along with another trial scheduled that same month in Washington D.C. Superior Court. .

The case is captioned Valerie Swann, et al. v. Johnson & Johnson, et al. case number 1422 CC09326-01 in Missouri’s 22nd Judicial Circuit Court.

Talcum powder cases continue in Federal court. About 134 cases are on file in the District of New Jersey Federal Court. The parties have been discussing various topics, including a protective order, a preservation order and other legal issues. A preservation order is where a plaintiff has to store physical or biological evidence for use in trials.

Johnson & Johnson reported in a recent filing with the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) that it has been named a defendant in at least 3,100 product liability claims. These lawsuits are claims by women that Baby Powder and Shower-to-Shower talc-based powders contributed to them getting ovarian cancer.

If you think you have a diagnosis of ovarian cancer due to your use of Baby Powder or Shower To Shower contact us today

 

Woman Wins Big On Talcum Powder Ovarian Cancer Claim

A Jury Granted More Than $70M In A J&J Baby Powder  Ovarian Cancer Lawsuit.

A California woman has been awarded more than $70 million  in a claim that Johnson and Johnson’s baby powder gave  her ovarian cancer.

“We are pleased the jury did the right thing. They once again reaffirmed the need for Johnson & Johnson to warn the public of the ovarian cancer risk associated with its product,” Jim Onder, an attorney for the plaintiff, advised The Associated Press.

“We deeply sympathize with the women and families impacted by ovarian cancer,” Carol Goodrich, a spokeswoman with Johnson & Johnson, said in a statement. “We will appeal today’s verdict because we are guided by the science, which supports the safety of Johnson’s Baby Powder.”

Is Baby Powder Safe?

It is now known that use of talc products can  increase a women’s risk of ovarian cancer.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer advises that the product is “possibly carcinogenic.” The National Toxicology Program, made up of parts of a few distinctive government organizations, has not completely inspected talc.

 

 

What Is Talc?

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is always seeking articles we believe will be of interest to our readers.  Talcum Powder  products causing ovarian cancer have resulted in an onslaught of lawsuits across the country. Talcum Powder is made from Talc. But, what exactly is Talc?
Talc is a hydrous magnesium silicate mineral with a chemical composition of Mg3Si4O10(OH)2. If you are not a chemist you probably have no idea what that means. In lay terms, Talcum powder is made from talc. Talc is a mineral made up of  magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. Talc is usually green, white, gray, brown, or colorless. It is a translucent mineral with a pearly luster.

About Talc In the US

The United States is self-sufficient for most types of talc used in manufacturing. Estimated 2011 production was 615,000 metric tons with a value of about $20 million. Three companies in the United States account for nearly 100% of the country’s production.

How Does Talc Form?
Talc is a mineral that is most often found in the metamorphic rocks of convergent plate boundaries. It forms from at least two processes. Most large talc deposits in the United States formed when heated waters carrying dissolved magnesium and silica reacted with dolomitic marbles. A second process of talc formation occurred when heat and chemically active fluids altered rocks such as dunite and serpentinite into talc.
Talc Mining In The US
Most talc in the United States is produced from an open pit mine where the rock is drilled, blasted, and partially crushed in the mining operation. The highest grade ores are produced by selective mining and sorting operations.

Great care is taken during the mining process to avoid contaminating the talc with other rock materials. These other materials can have an adverse effect on the color of the product. Contamination can introduce hard particles that cause problems in applications where talc is being used because of its softness or lubricating properties.

Partially crushed rock is taken from the mine to a mill, where it is further reduced in particle size. Impurities are sometimes removed by froth flotation or mechanical processing. The mills produce crushed or finely ground talc that meets customer requirements for particle size, brightness, composition, and other properties.
Uses of Talc: Talc is used as a filler, coating, pigment, dusting agent and extender in plastics, ceramics, paint, paper, cosmetics, roofing, rubber and many other products.

Talc Information

U.S. Talc — Baby Powder and Much More: U.S. Geological Survey, Fact Sheet FS-065-00, September 2000.

Talc in Cosmetics: United States Food and Drug Administration, website article, last accessed August 2016.

Use Of Talc in Cosmetics and Antiperspirants
Finely ground talc is used as the powder base of many cosmetic products. The tiny platelets of a talc powder readily adhere to the skin but can be washed off easily. Talc’s softness allows it to be applied and removed without causing skin abrasion.

Talc also has the ability to absorb oils and perspiration produced by human skin. The ability of talc to absorb moisture, absorb odor, adhere to the skin, serve as a lubricant, and produce an astringent effect in contact with human skin make it an important ingredient in many antiperspirants. In 2011, about 7% of the talc consumed in the United States was used to make cosmetics and antiperspirant.

Talc and asbestos occur naturally and may occur in close proximity in some metamorphic rocks. Studies published in the 1960s and 1970s identified health concerns about the use of talc that contains asbestos in some cosmetic products.

According to the FDA, “These studies have not conclusively demonstrated such a link, or if such a link existed, what risk factors might be involved.” To address these concerns, talc mining sites are now carefully selected and ores are carefully processed to avoid the presence of asbestos in talc destined for use in the cosmetics industry.

Talc used in Talcum powder has been associated with the development of ovarian cancer due to inflammation

 

 

Alternatives To Talcum Powder

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues to get calls on a daily basis from women with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer seeking a Talcum Powder lawyer. The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline offers the latest news on Talcum Powder and the Talc Lawsuits. We found this article online about alternatives to talcum powder and think it will be helpful to our readers.

What Are The Alternatives To Talcum Powder?

Not all medical professionals agree that a link between baby powder and ovarian cancer exists.
The recent headlines about baby powder and its connection to ovarian cancer may raise more questions than answers. In February, a Missouri court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million in damages to the family of Jackie Fox, a woman who died of ovarian cancer. The lawsuit said her death was linked to her 50-year daily habit of applying baby powder. But Johnson & Johnson insisted a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven.

“The verdict goes against decades of sound science proving the safety of talc as a cosmetic ingredient in multiple products, and while we sympathize with the family of the plaintiff, we strongly disagree with the outcome,” a spokesman for the company said in a statement.

Prosecutors say Johnson & Johnson knew about the risk since the early 1980s and did not protect its customers. In fact, the first study conducted on talc powder use on female genitalia found a 92 percent increased risk for ovarian cancer with women who reported genital talc use. But still, other doctors disagree. “Several decades of medical research do not support the hypothesis that use of talcum powder causes ovarian cancer,” said Dr. Hal Lawrence, chief executive officer of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

If all this back-and-forth has you questioning your baby powder usage, fear not. There are some safe alternatives to talc powder:

Cornstarch. Found in the baking aisle of your local grocery store, cornstarch is a great natural alternative to talc. The consistency is exactly the same, so it’ll help soak up wetness just as well. Cornstarch is derived from the endosperm of a corn kernel and is often used to help thicken sauces.

Arrowroot starch or tapioca starch. Both staples in a paleo baker’s kitchen, these starches are all-natural alternatives to talc. Arrowroot is derived from several tropical South American plants. Tapioca starch is derived from the crushed-up pulp of the South American cassava plant, a woody shrub. Both are used in paleo recipes as alternatives to flour and cornstarch. If you’re using it to on your baby’s sore bottom, try this recipe with some extra ingredients to help soothe.

Baking soda. You thought sodium bicarbonate, otherwise known as baking soda, only had 100 uses. Well, here’s one more: This common pantry item can be used in place of baby powder. Some people even use it as deodorant, applying some to their underarms each morning. It can also deodorize the air. As a matter of fact, I keep one container in my pantry, one under my sink, one in my laundry room and one in the bathroom.

Oat flour. Try this if you’re looking for a slightly coarser powder than the ones mentioned above.

Commercial baby powder alternatives. These products combine the items listed above with essential oils, so the powder smells pretty nice. Just to name a few:

Burt’s Bee’s Baby Dusting Powder
Honeybee Gardens Deodorant Powder
The Honest Company Organic Baby Powder
Nature’s Baby Dusting Powder
Here’s one last reason to consider the all-natural route: Talc is poisonous when inhaled or swallowed. It can cause breathing problems, which is why the American Academy of Pediatrics urges caution when it comes to using talc powder on babies.

If you or a loved one has a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and you or they have used Talcum Powder to dry off around the genital areas for over five years it would be in your best interest to call the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline and speak to one of our talcum powder lawyers

FDA Approves New Ovarian Cancer Drug

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline has qualified Baby Powder and Shower To Shower lawyers for women who feel their ovarian cancer diagnosis is due to ” dusting Off ” for years with talcum powder products.  The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues to keep woman and families updated on the talcum Powder Lawsuit latest news and any new research or news pertaining to ovarian cancer that we think will be helpful to our readers.

We found this  online and feel it is important information for our readers.

FRIDAY, Dec. 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) — The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug to treat advanced ovarian cancer, along with a test to identify patients eligible to receive the drug.

Lynparza (olaparib) belongs to a new class of drugs called poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. The drug is for women who have already received extensive treatment for advanced ovarian cancer associated with defective BRCA genes, according to an FDA news release issued Friday.

“Today’s approval constitutes the first of a new class of drugs for treating ovarian cancer,” Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the Office of Hematology and Oncology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in the news release.

“Lynparza is approved for patients with specific abnormalities in the BRCA gene and is an example of how a greater understanding of the underlying mechanisms of disease can lead to targeted, more personalized treatment,” he said.

Approval of the AstraZeneca drug was based on a clinical trial of almost 140 women with BRCA mutation-associated ovarian cancer. Thirty-four percent of the patients on the drug had partial shrinkage or complete disappearance of their tumors for an average of eight months, the FDA reported.

Nausea, fatigue, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, decreased appetite, joint and muscle pain, and cold-like symptoms were common side effects of the drug. More serious side effects included lung inflammation; the bone marrow cancer acute myeloid leukemia; and myelodysplastic syndrome, a condition where the bone marrow is unable to produce enough functioning blood cells, the FDA said.

Women must undergo a genetic test to confirm BRCA gene mutations before they can be treated with Lynparza. The test to confirm those genes was approved by the FDA in conjunction with the drug.

BRCA genes play a role in repairing damaged DNA. Normally, they work to suppress tumor growth. Women with mutations that cause defective BRCA genes have an increased risk for ovarian and breast cancer. It’s believed that 10 to 15 percent of all ovarian cancer is associated with these mutations, the FDA said.

In 2014, nearly 22,000 American women will be diagnosed with ovarian cancer and more than 14,000 will die from the disease, according to the U.S. National Cancer Institute.

If you or a loved one has a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and has used talcum powder products for years contact the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline.

History Of Talcum Powder | Talcum Powder Warnings

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is receiving a huge influx of calls on a daily basis from women or family members asking questions about the link between Talcum Powder and ovarian cancer. They cannot believe that they were never warned of the dangers. Many have lost a loved on to this dreaded disease. They watched their mother use this product daily to “dust off.” The Talcum Powder lawsuit Helpline continues to offer information we feel would be of interest to our followers. The long history of Talcum powder was of interest to us and we researched it to get a prospective on the ovarian cancer link. It has been around a long time. We find this overview and timeline online and are sharing it with you.

What Is The History Of Talcum Powder?
Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder has been around for more than a century. It was developed by the pharmaceutical company in 1983. It has been  used by generations of families to prevent diaper rash and other minor skin irritations.  The label on the original tin can that stated the powder was “For Toilet and Nursery.”  J&J enjoyed a reputation as “the Baby Company.” Its Baby Powder  was considered one of the most familiar and trusted brands in the world. Johnson & Johnson began marketing its talcum powder products to women, as a way to stay fresh and prevent vaginal odors.  This is now  been linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

The following is a timeline of of Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products.

 

Talcum Powder Timeline
1890s – J&J’s director of scientific affairs, Frederick Kilmer, sends small containers of Italian talc to patients who suffered skin irritations after using medicated plasters, to help relieve the irritation.

1893 – Johnson’s Baby Powder is introduced. At first, it is distributed to midwives and mothers following childbirth. Soon, it becomes so popular that J&J begins selling it in drugstores.

1913 – J&J begins using the tagline “Best for the Baby – Best for You” in advertising material, marketing its baby powder and other products to adults.

1960s – The American Academy of Pediatrics warns against the use of talc-based baby powders, due to the risk of aspiration.

1961 – The medical journal Fertility and Sterility publishes research indicating that carbon particles similar to those found in talc may migrate to the ovaries in women who use talcum powder on their genital area.

1970s – Johnson & Johnson begins marketing its baby powder and other products to families, encouraging so-called “family usage.”

1970s – The chemical similarity between talc and asbestos provides the basis for concerns about the potential for perineal talcum powder use to cause ovarian cancer in women.

1971 – British researchers analyze 13 ovarian tumors and find particles of talc deeply embedded in 10 of them.

1980s – Johnson & Johnson earns a reputation for making baby products that are “exceptionally pure and safe.” The Johnson’s Baby brand becomes popular among adults due to the perception that “baby products are milder than others.”

1982 – The first study linking perineal use of talcum powder to an increased risk of ovarian cancer in women is published by researchers from Harvard, who find that using talcum powder for feminine hygiene purposes increases the risk of ovarian cancer by 92%.

1985 – At this time, 70% of Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder in the United States is used by adults.

2006 – The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies talc as “possibly carcinogenic (cancer causing) to humans.”

2013 – The first woman to file a talcum powder lawsuit against J&J turns down a $1.3 million settlement in favor of taking her case to trial and raising awareness about the link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer.

June 2013 – Cancer Prevention Research publishes a study indicating that women who use talc-based powders on their genital area may face a 20% to 30% higher risk of ovarian cancer.

October 2014 – Research published in the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health warns that talcum powder may cause mesothelioma side effects in women.

May 2015 – A jury in Los Angeles orders Colgate-Palmolive to pay $12.4 million in a lawsuit filed over mesothelioma side effects allegedly caused by exposure to the company’s asbestos-containing talcum powder.

February 2016 – A St. Louis jury orders Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million to the family of a woman who died from ovarian cancer after using the company’s talc-based body powders.

April 2016 – A Bloomberg Businessweek report indicates that J&J knew as early as 1971 about the potential for talc-based baby powders to cause ovarian cancer in women, yet continued to encourage women to use its talcum powder as a feminine hygiene product.

May 2016 – A woman who developed ovarian cancer after using J&J talcum powder for several decades is awarded $55 million in damages by a jury in the same St. Louis courthouse.

May 2016 – Internal memos indicate that J&J may have manipulated research and lied to the public about the dangers of talcum powder.

May 2016 – A study published in the medical journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention finds that the risk of ovarian cancer from talcum powder may be higher among African-American women.

June 2016 – A New York Times report reveals that the company that supplied J&J with talc for its baby powder and body powder products warned as early as 2006, that talc may increase the risk of ovarian cancer in women, but this warning never made it to the talcum powder label.

Talcum powder products like Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower To Shower have been around for over a century. When did Johnson and Johnson know that their products could cause ovarian cancer. Why did they let you use it for years. But, even more importantly, how dare they market it for use “down there” when they knw it could cause ovarian cancer.

If you or a family member used these products for years to keep dry, you must join other families and woman who are filing Talcum Powder ovarian cancer lawsuits. This product must be removed from the shelves or a clear warning be put on it.

 

 

Talcum Powder Dangerous and They Never Told You

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues to keep woman updated on the news regarding the link between Talcum Powder products and ovarian cancer. We continue to be amazed and horrified as we learn again and again THEY KNEW and never told us about this link. Didn’t anyone tell them that ovarian cancer can be fatal and destroy lives. We can lose our mothers, grandmothers, wives, daughters, friends and women we love and care about from this fatal disease.

We found this article online written by a dermatologist and would like to share it with our readers. We will be commenting as well.

Why we should all be more careful when sprinkling the talcum powder
by MiriamStoppard
Studies have linked talc to ovarian cancer, especially if used in the genital area, and it can also act as an irritant. It may feel soft and soothing but there are health risks to talc. As a dermatologist, I’ve never been keen on talcum powder. It can accumulate in skin creases and irritate, and its particles can act as an abrasive.

I’m even less happy using talcum powder on babies whose delicate skin is much more vulnerable to damage.

There was a scare a few decades back which linked talcum powder granules to bowel disease, such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease .

In 1991, Welsh scientists also ­discovered particles of talc embedded in ovarian and cervical cancers.

A report out earlier this year linked the use of talc on genitals with a 44% increase in invasive ovarian cancer among African American women.

The International Agency for Research on Cancer in 2006 also classified talcum powder as a possible human carcinogen if used in the female genital area.

But cancer is difficult to understand because it develops over a long period and can be influenced by several factors, including lifestyle, genes and environment. Talc is a natural clay mineral composed of magnesium and silicon.
Researchers have found links to ovarian cancer
Because of its softness it’s often used in cosmetic products, such as blusher, because it prevents caking and absorbs excess moisture.

It’s also added into some tablets and chewing gum. Talc residues are often found near asbestos , a known carcinogen which means manufacturers have to take strong measures to avoid contamination when it is mined.

Some women like to use the powder on their inner thighs to prevent chafing, while others sprinkle it on their underwear to stay fresh.

But in 1982, Harvard professor Dr Daniel W Cramer and his colleagues compared 215 women with ovarian cancer and 215 healthy women who served as a control group.

Women who used talcum powder were at nearly twice the risk of having ovarian cancer than non-users. Those who used it regularly on their genitals and sanitary pads were at more than three times the risk.

Why talc use might lead to cancer is not clear. Studies have shown that talc crystals can move up the genitourinary tract into the peritoneal cavity, where the ovaries are.

And because talc ­particles can set off inflammation, and inflammation plays an important role in the development of ovarian cancer – and any other cancer – could be a likely mechanism.

Now baby powder carries a warning to keep out of reach of children. And pediatricians, as well as dermatologists, discourage its use on babies, who can become ill or die after breathing in the particles.

You have been warned.

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline suggests. Cornstarch can serve the same purpose and is alot less dangerous. We continue to get calls on a daily basis from women horrified by the news of the dangers of Talcum Powder. Many have lost a loved one to ovarian cancer. Many remember having had the powder sprinkled on them as babies and have used it on their babies. The woman of America are stunned at how this household name is now a danger to their lives. If you believe your diagnosis of ovarian cancer or you have lost a loved one to this disease and it is related to daily use of Talcum Powder products we encourage you to join other woman and families in the Talcum Powder Lawsuit.

Liquid Biopsies For Earlier Ovarian Cancer Tracking

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues in one of  it’s missions  to offer the latest news regarding ovarian cancer. We receive dozens of calls on a daily basis from women who feel their use of Talcum Powder products has resulted in their ovarian cancer diagnosis. We continue to connect women with qualified talcum powder ovarian cancer lawyers and offer news we feel will be helpful to these women.

We found this latest news online and hope it will be helpful to our followers.

There is new news about  liquid biopsies offering  hope for earlier treatment and  better tracking of ovarian cancer.

A promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer has been identified by researchers a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. New research finds liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears.

If you have used Talcum Powder products and suspect an ovarian cancer this may be an option to check out with your doctor.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have found a promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer — a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. New research from George Vasmatzis, Ph.D., of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic, finds liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears. That could lead to earlier intervention and more effective, individualized treatment. Dr. Vasmatzis’ research on the “Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-free DNA From Ovarian Cancers” is published in the July 20 edition of Scientific Reports.

“With liquid biopsies, we don’t have to wait for tumor growth to get a DNA sample,” says Dr. Vasmatzis. “This important discovery makes it possible for us detect recurrence of the disease earlier than other diagnostic methods. We can repeat liquid biopsies to monitor the progression of the cancer. That gives hope of a better treatment plan over time.”

The study was done on 10 patients in advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Blood was drawn before and after surgery. Investigators compared DNA from the liquid blood biopsies to DNA tissue samples from the tumor, using mate-pair sequencing — an inexpensive whole exome sequencing that can reveal genetic changes that contribute to tumor growth.

“In this study, the blood drawn before and after surgery and the surgical tissue was used to identify DNA fragments with abnormal junctions that can only be seen in this patient’s tumor DNA,” explains Dr. Vasmatzis. “Next-generation mate-pair sequencing was used to identify specific DNA changes of the tumor to create an individualized monitoring panel for liquid biopsy. This allows us to shape treatment to the individual patient rather than using a standard treatment that may not work for everyone.”

When post-surgery DNA matched that of the tumor, patients were later found to have had a recurrence of ovarian cancer. However, when the post-surgery DNA did not match the DNA of the tumor, patients were found to be in remission.

Ovarian cancer has one of the highest death rates of all gynecological cancers, because the tumor often cannot be detected until the late stages. Most patients go into remission after initial treatment, but the tumor returns 75 percent of the time. The next stage of ovarian cancer that develops typically does not respond to chemotherapy. More than 21,000 women in the U.S. were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and 14,000 women died of the disease in 2015.

We wonder if the 1000’s of women using talcum powder products and the latest research on the link between talcum powder use and ovarian cancer has anything to do with such huge numbers. Many women have used talcum powder for years, especially in the Afro American and Hispanic community. J & J marketed their products to these women and the idea of smelling fresh and clean became a girlfriend to girlfriend positive  in smelling  “sweet and fresh like  Talcum Powder today.”