Tag: Talcum powder – ovarian cancer

What Is Talc?

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is always seeking articles we believe will be of interest to our readers.  Talcum Powder  products causing ovarian cancer have resulted in an onslaught of lawsuits across the country. Talcum Powder is made from Talc. But, what exactly is Talc?
Talc is a hydrous magnesium silicate mineral with a chemical composition of Mg3Si4O10(OH)2. If you are not a chemist you probably have no idea what that means. In lay terms, Talcum powder is made from talc. Talc is a mineral made up of  magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. Talc is usually green, white, gray, brown, or colorless. It is a translucent mineral with a pearly luster.

About Talc In the US

The United States is self-sufficient for most types of talc used in manufacturing. Estimated 2011 production was 615,000 metric tons with a value of about $20 million. Three companies in the United States account for nearly 100% of the country’s production.

How Does Talc Form?
Talc is a mineral that is most often found in the metamorphic rocks of convergent plate boundaries. It forms from at least two processes. Most large talc deposits in the United States formed when heated waters carrying dissolved magnesium and silica reacted with dolomitic marbles. A second process of talc formation occurred when heat and chemically active fluids altered rocks such as dunite and serpentinite into talc.
Talc Mining In The US
Most talc in the United States is produced from an open pit mine where the rock is drilled, blasted, and partially crushed in the mining operation. The highest grade ores are produced by selective mining and sorting operations.

Great care is taken during the mining process to avoid contaminating the talc with other rock materials. These other materials can have an adverse effect on the color of the product. Contamination can introduce hard particles that cause problems in applications where talc is being used because of its softness or lubricating properties.

Partially crushed rock is taken from the mine to a mill, where it is further reduced in particle size. Impurities are sometimes removed by froth flotation or mechanical processing. The mills produce crushed or finely ground talc that meets customer requirements for particle size, brightness, composition, and other properties.
Uses of Talc: Talc is used as a filler, coating, pigment, dusting agent and extender in plastics, ceramics, paint, paper, cosmetics, roofing, rubber and many other products.

Talc Information

U.S. Talc — Baby Powder and Much More: U.S. Geological Survey, Fact Sheet FS-065-00, September 2000.

Talc in Cosmetics: United States Food and Drug Administration, website article, last accessed August 2016.

Use Of Talc in Cosmetics and Antiperspirants
Finely ground talc is used as the powder base of many cosmetic products. The tiny platelets of a talc powder readily adhere to the skin but can be washed off easily. Talc’s softness allows it to be applied and removed without causing skin abrasion.

Talc also has the ability to absorb oils and perspiration produced by human skin. The ability of talc to absorb moisture, absorb odor, adhere to the skin, serve as a lubricant, and produce an astringent effect in contact with human skin make it an important ingredient in many antiperspirants. In 2011, about 7% of the talc consumed in the United States was used to make cosmetics and antiperspirant.

Talc and asbestos occur naturally and may occur in close proximity in some metamorphic rocks. Studies published in the 1960s and 1970s identified health concerns about the use of talc that contains asbestos in some cosmetic products.

According to the FDA, “These studies have not conclusively demonstrated such a link, or if such a link existed, what risk factors might be involved.” To address these concerns, talc mining sites are now carefully selected and ores are carefully processed to avoid the presence of asbestos in talc destined for use in the cosmetics industry.

Talc used in Talcum powder has been associated with the development of ovarian cancer due to inflammation

 

 

Liquid Biopsies For Earlier Ovarian Cancer Tracking

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues in one of  it’s missions  to offer the latest news regarding ovarian cancer. We receive dozens of calls on a daily basis from women who feel their use of Talcum Powder products has resulted in their ovarian cancer diagnosis. We continue to connect women with qualified talcum powder ovarian cancer lawyers and offer news we feel will be helpful to these women.

We found this latest news online and hope it will be helpful to our followers.

There is new news about  liquid biopsies offering  hope for earlier treatment and  better tracking of ovarian cancer.

A promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer has been identified by researchers a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. New research finds liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears.

If you have used Talcum Powder products and suspect an ovarian cancer this may be an option to check out with your doctor.

Researchers at the Mayo Clinic Center for Individualized Medicine have found a promising new way to monitor and treat recurrence of ovarian cancer — a hard-to-detect disease that claims many lives. New research from George Vasmatzis, Ph.D., of the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at Mayo Clinic, finds liquid biopsies from blood tests and DNA sequencing can detect a return of ovarian cancer long before a tumor reappears. That could lead to earlier intervention and more effective, individualized treatment. Dr. Vasmatzis’ research on the “Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-free DNA From Ovarian Cancers” is published in the July 20 edition of Scientific Reports.

“With liquid biopsies, we don’t have to wait for tumor growth to get a DNA sample,” says Dr. Vasmatzis. “This important discovery makes it possible for us detect recurrence of the disease earlier than other diagnostic methods. We can repeat liquid biopsies to monitor the progression of the cancer. That gives hope of a better treatment plan over time.”

The study was done on 10 patients in advanced stages of ovarian cancer. Blood was drawn before and after surgery. Investigators compared DNA from the liquid blood biopsies to DNA tissue samples from the tumor, using mate-pair sequencing — an inexpensive whole exome sequencing that can reveal genetic changes that contribute to tumor growth.

“In this study, the blood drawn before and after surgery and the surgical tissue was used to identify DNA fragments with abnormal junctions that can only be seen in this patient’s tumor DNA,” explains Dr. Vasmatzis. “Next-generation mate-pair sequencing was used to identify specific DNA changes of the tumor to create an individualized monitoring panel for liquid biopsy. This allows us to shape treatment to the individual patient rather than using a standard treatment that may not work for everyone.”

When post-surgery DNA matched that of the tumor, patients were later found to have had a recurrence of ovarian cancer. However, when the post-surgery DNA did not match the DNA of the tumor, patients were found to be in remission.

Ovarian cancer has one of the highest death rates of all gynecological cancers, because the tumor often cannot be detected until the late stages. Most patients go into remission after initial treatment, but the tumor returns 75 percent of the time. The next stage of ovarian cancer that develops typically does not respond to chemotherapy. More than 21,000 women in the U.S. were diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and 14,000 women died of the disease in 2015.

We wonder if the 1000’s of women using talcum powder products and the latest research on the link between talcum powder use and ovarian cancer has anything to do with such huge numbers. Many women have used talcum powder for years, especially in the Afro American and Hispanic community. J & J marketed their products to these women and the idea of smelling fresh and clean became a girlfriend to girlfriend positive  in smelling  “sweet and fresh like  Talcum Powder today.”

Talcum Powder – Ovarian Cancer Link Alert

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline  alerts women who didn’t know of the possible link between   Talcum powder product use  on the pelvic area and ovarian cancer. Talcum powder lawyers claim that if talcum powder is used for years the particles can travel to the fallopian tubes and the ovaries. They can stay there for years and cause irritation which eventually can result in cancer cells. Ovarian cancer rates are highest in women aged 55-64 years. This is the exact age group that Talcum powder was marketed to when they were  teenagers and young women.

Johnson & Johnson is now  facing more than 1,000 lawsuits from women claiming they  knew that the talc in its Baby Powder and Shower to Shower products was linked to ovarian cancer when used in the genital area. They did not warn anyone of this. Both products were marketed extensively  for feminine hygiene. . A 1988 ad for Shower to Shower said “just a sprinkle a day keeps odor away.” Others told women: “Your body perspires in more places than just under your arms.”

Is Talcum Powder  Johnson and Johnson’s next horror for women?  1000’s of women are still suffering from their vaginal mesh products. The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline receives dozens of calls every day from women who feel their ovarian cancer is from use of these Talcum Powder products. Juries have started to award female victims and families who have lost loved ones compensation.

What Are The Symptoms Of Ovarian Cancer?

Pain in the pelvis or abdomen
Bloating in the abdomen
Urinary urgency
Urinary frequency
Constipation or diarrhea
Feeling full quickly while eating
Having difficulty eating
Vaginal bleeding or other discharge that is different than normal
Back pain
If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor.

What Is Talcum Powder?

Talcum powder is made from talc or   hydrated magnesium silicate which occurs naturally as a mineral in formations like soapstone. For over 120 years, Johnson & Johnson has marketed talcum powder around the world as a baby powder and for adults to absorb sweat in products like Shower to Shower.

Johnson and Johnson has  targeted women to increase sales. “Want to feel cool, smooth and dry? It’s as easy as taking powder from a baby,” was the text in a  Johnson & Johnson ad from the 1960s.

In the 1970s, the first studies emerged showing that talc was deeply embedded into ovarian cancers. Johnson & Johnson introduced corn starch alternatives but it continued to offer talc-based products. In 2014 Johnson & Johnson’s annual talcum powder sales were estimated at $374 million.

The Research Is In On Talcum Powder

The World Health Organization reports that talc is “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” Talc is banned in Europe.

If you believe your diagnosis of ovarian cancer is due to use of Johnson’s Baby Powder or Shower To Shower speak to one of our Talcum powder lawyers.

Spread The Word On Talcum Powder Lawsuits and Dangers

Do you know someone who has ovarian cancer. Tell them about the dangers of Talcum powder.

FDA’s Responsibility In Monitoring Talcum Powder Products

Talcum Powder- Baby Powder  lawyers  discuss FDA and Talcum Powder Warnings

Could The FDA issued a warning regarding Talcum Powder and the link to ovarian cancer?

The Maharashtra state Food and Drug Administration has  collected Johnson’s and Johnson’s baby powder samples for lab testing. This action was taken after taking a cue from the death of a 62-year-old woman in America, which is believed to be due to sustained use of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder. She passed away due to ovarian cancer.

The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given J & J a notice  following a U.S. court’s verdict that awarded $72 million to a 62-year-old woman’s family after she died of cancer due to prolonged use of the company’s talcum powder.

The The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration- FDA has collected samples of Shower to Shower, Dermicool, Ponds and Nycil talcum powder brands besides J&J from across Maharashtra and sent them to the laboratory to check if they follow the rules laid down under the Drug and Cosmetic Act.

The FDA In The United States

What Is The FDA’s authority over cosmetic safety
Under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), cosmetic products and ingredients, with the exception of color additives, do not have to undergo FDA review or approval before they go on the market. Cosmetics must be properly labeled, and they must be safe for use by consumers under labeled or customary conditions of use. Cosmetic companies have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients, but the law does not require them to share their safety information with FDA.

FDA monitors for potential safety problems with cosmetic products on the market and takes action when needed to protect public health. Before we can take such action against a cosmetic, we need sound scientific data to show that it is harmful under its intended use.

Talc: What it is and how it is used in cosmetics
Talc is a naturally occurring mineral, mined from the earth, composed of magnesium, silicon, oxygen, and hydrogen. Chemically, talc is a hydrous magnesium silicate with a chemical formula of Mg3Si4O10(OH)2.

Talc has many uses in cosmetics and other personal care products; in food, such as rice and chewing gum; and in the manufacture of tablets. For example, it may be used to absorb moisture, to prevent caking, to make facial makeup opaque, or to improve the feel of a product.

Asbestos: What it is, why it’s a concern, and how to prevent its occurrence in cosmetics
Asbestos is also a naturally occurring silicate mineral, but with a different crystal structure. Both talc and asbestos are naturally occurring minerals that may be found in close proximity in the earth. Unlike talc, however, asbestos is a known carcinogen. For this reason, FDA considers it unacceptable for cosmetic talc to be contaminated with asbestos.

However the FDA has not issued any warnings regarding talc or talcum powder and despite the research showing that there may be a link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer, the Food and Drug Administration is taking no action.

There has been studies  going back to the 1960s that  suggest a possible link between the use of powders containing talc and the incidence of ovarian cancer.  Questions about the potential contamination of talc with asbestos have been raised since the 1970s.

To prevent contamination of talc with asbestos, it is essential to select talc mining sites carefully and take steps to purify the ore sufficiently.

How FDA followed up on the latest reports
Because safety questions about the possible presence of asbestos in talc are raised periodically, FDA decided to conduct an exploratory survey of currently marketed cosmetic-grade raw material talc, as well as some cosmetic products containing talc.

Because FDA’s cosmetic laboratories do not have the equipment needed to perform the analyses, we searched for a qualified outside laboratory to do the work. We contracted with AMA Analytical Services, Inc. (AMA) of Lanham, MD to conduct this laboratory survey, based on demonstrated experience with asbestos analysis in complex matrices, appropriate facilities, equipment, personnel, analytical strategy, and budget criteria. The study ran from September 28, 2009 to September 27, 2010.

How the survey was conducted
The first step was to identify cosmetic talc suppliers and talc-containing cosmetic products. We found seven talc suppliers identified in the 2008 edition of the International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook and two more by searching online. The contract laboratory contacted each supplier to request samples of its talc. Of the nine suppliers identified, four complied with the request.

We found talc-containing cosmetic products to analyze by visiting various retail outlets in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The samples identified for testing included low, medium, and high priced products, along with some from “niche” markets, in order to cover as broad a product range as possible. A total of thirty-four cosmetic products containing talc were selected, including eye shadow, blush, foundation, face powder, and body powder. All cosmetic products were purchased from retail stores in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

The contract laboratory analyzed the samples using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods published by the New York State Department of Health, Environmental Laboratory Approval Program. Each sample was analyzed three times using both methods.

The results of FDA’s survey and what they mean
The survey found no asbestos fibers or structures in any of the samples of cosmetic-grade raw material talc or cosmetic products containing talc. The results were limited, however, by the fact that only four talc suppliers submitted samples and by the number of products tested. For these reasons, while FDA finds these results informative, they do not prove that most or all talc or talc-containing cosmetic products currently marketed in the United States are likely to be free of asbestos contamination. “As always, when potential public health concerns are raised, we will continue to monitor for new information and take appropriate actions to protect the public health.”