Tag: Talcum powder

Alternatives To Talcum Powder

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline continues to get calls on a daily basis from women with a diagnosis of ovarian cancer seeking a Talcum Powder lawyer. The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline offers the latest news on Talcum Powder and the Talc Lawsuits. We found this article online about alternatives to talcum powder and think it will be helpful to our readers.

What Are The Alternatives To Talcum Powder?

Not all medical professionals agree that a link between baby powder and ovarian cancer exists.
The recent headlines about baby powder and its connection to ovarian cancer may raise more questions than answers. In February, a Missouri court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million in damages to the family of Jackie Fox, a woman who died of ovarian cancer. The lawsuit said her death was linked to her 50-year daily habit of applying baby powder. But Johnson & Johnson insisted a correlation between talc powder and ovarian cancer has not been proven.

“The verdict goes against decades of sound science proving the safety of talc as a cosmetic ingredient in multiple products, and while we sympathize with the family of the plaintiff, we strongly disagree with the outcome,” a spokesman for the company said in a statement.

Prosecutors say Johnson & Johnson knew about the risk since the early 1980s and did not protect its customers. In fact, the first study conducted on talc powder use on female genitalia found a 92 percent increased risk for ovarian cancer with women who reported genital talc use. But still, other doctors disagree. “Several decades of medical research do not support the hypothesis that use of talcum powder causes ovarian cancer,” said Dr. Hal Lawrence, chief executive officer of the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

If all this back-and-forth has you questioning your baby powder usage, fear not. There are some safe alternatives to talc powder:

Cornstarch. Found in the baking aisle of your local grocery store, cornstarch is a great natural alternative to talc. The consistency is exactly the same, so it’ll help soak up wetness just as well. Cornstarch is derived from the endosperm of a corn kernel and is often used to help thicken sauces.

Arrowroot starch or tapioca starch. Both staples in a paleo baker’s kitchen, these starches are all-natural alternatives to talc. Arrowroot is derived from several tropical South American plants. Tapioca starch is derived from the crushed-up pulp of the South American cassava plant, a woody shrub. Both are used in paleo recipes as alternatives to flour and cornstarch. If you’re using it to on your baby’s sore bottom, try this recipe with some extra ingredients to help soothe.

Baking soda. You thought sodium bicarbonate, otherwise known as baking soda, only had 100 uses. Well, here’s one more: This common pantry item can be used in place of baby powder. Some people even use it as deodorant, applying some to their underarms each morning. It can also deodorize the air. As a matter of fact, I keep one container in my pantry, one under my sink, one in my laundry room and one in the bathroom.

Oat flour. Try this if you’re looking for a slightly coarser powder than the ones mentioned above.

Commercial baby powder alternatives. These products combine the items listed above with essential oils, so the powder smells pretty nice. Just to name a few:

Burt’s Bee’s Baby Dusting Powder
Honeybee Gardens Deodorant Powder
The Honest Company Organic Baby Powder
Nature’s Baby Dusting Powder
Here’s one last reason to consider the all-natural route: Talc is poisonous when inhaled or swallowed. It can cause breathing problems, which is why the American Academy of Pediatrics urges caution when it comes to using talc powder on babies.

If you or a loved one has a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and you or they have used Talcum Powder to dry off around the genital areas for over five years it would be in your best interest to call the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline and speak to one of our talcum powder lawyers

History Of Talcum Powder | Talcum Powder Warnings

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is receiving a huge influx of calls on a daily basis from women or family members asking questions about the link between Talcum Powder and ovarian cancer. They cannot believe that they were never warned of the dangers. Many have lost a loved on to this dreaded disease. They watched their mother use this product daily to “dust off.” The Talcum Powder lawsuit Helpline continues to offer information we feel would be of interest to our followers. The long history of Talcum powder was of interest to us and we researched it to get a prospective on the ovarian cancer link. It has been around a long time. We find this overview and timeline online and are sharing it with you.

What Is The History Of Talcum Powder?
Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder has been around for more than a century. It was developed by the pharmaceutical company in 1983. It has been  used by generations of families to prevent diaper rash and other minor skin irritations.  The label on the original tin can that stated the powder was “For Toilet and Nursery.”  J&J enjoyed a reputation as “the Baby Company.” Its Baby Powder  was considered one of the most familiar and trusted brands in the world. Johnson & Johnson began marketing its talcum powder products to women, as a way to stay fresh and prevent vaginal odors.  This is now  been linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer.

The following is a timeline of of Johnson & Johnson’s talcum powder products.

 

Talcum Powder Timeline
1890s – J&J’s director of scientific affairs, Frederick Kilmer, sends small containers of Italian talc to patients who suffered skin irritations after using medicated plasters, to help relieve the irritation.

1893 – Johnson’s Baby Powder is introduced. At first, it is distributed to midwives and mothers following childbirth. Soon, it becomes so popular that J&J begins selling it in drugstores.

1913 – J&J begins using the tagline “Best for the Baby – Best for You” in advertising material, marketing its baby powder and other products to adults.

1960s – The American Academy of Pediatrics warns against the use of talc-based baby powders, due to the risk of aspiration.

1961 – The medical journal Fertility and Sterility publishes research indicating that carbon particles similar to those found in talc may migrate to the ovaries in women who use talcum powder on their genital area.

1970s – Johnson & Johnson begins marketing its baby powder and other products to families, encouraging so-called “family usage.”

1970s – The chemical similarity between talc and asbestos provides the basis for concerns about the potential for perineal talcum powder use to cause ovarian cancer in women.

1971 – British researchers analyze 13 ovarian tumors and find particles of talc deeply embedded in 10 of them.

1980s – Johnson & Johnson earns a reputation for making baby products that are “exceptionally pure and safe.” The Johnson’s Baby brand becomes popular among adults due to the perception that “baby products are milder than others.”

1982 – The first study linking perineal use of talcum powder to an increased risk of ovarian cancer in women is published by researchers from Harvard, who find that using talcum powder for feminine hygiene purposes increases the risk of ovarian cancer by 92%.

1985 – At this time, 70% of Johnson & Johnson’s Baby Powder in the United States is used by adults.

2006 – The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classifies talc as “possibly carcinogenic (cancer causing) to humans.”

2013 – The first woman to file a talcum powder lawsuit against J&J turns down a $1.3 million settlement in favor of taking her case to trial and raising awareness about the link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer.

June 2013 – Cancer Prevention Research publishes a study indicating that women who use talc-based powders on their genital area may face a 20% to 30% higher risk of ovarian cancer.

October 2014 – Research published in the International Journal of Occupational and Environmental Health warns that talcum powder may cause mesothelioma side effects in women.

May 2015 – A jury in Los Angeles orders Colgate-Palmolive to pay $12.4 million in a lawsuit filed over mesothelioma side effects allegedly caused by exposure to the company’s asbestos-containing talcum powder.

February 2016 – A St. Louis jury orders Johnson & Johnson to pay $72 million to the family of a woman who died from ovarian cancer after using the company’s talc-based body powders.

April 2016 – A Bloomberg Businessweek report indicates that J&J knew as early as 1971 about the potential for talc-based baby powders to cause ovarian cancer in women, yet continued to encourage women to use its talcum powder as a feminine hygiene product.

May 2016 – A woman who developed ovarian cancer after using J&J talcum powder for several decades is awarded $55 million in damages by a jury in the same St. Louis courthouse.

May 2016 – Internal memos indicate that J&J may have manipulated research and lied to the public about the dangers of talcum powder.

May 2016 – A study published in the medical journal Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention finds that the risk of ovarian cancer from talcum powder may be higher among African-American women.

June 2016 – A New York Times report reveals that the company that supplied J&J with talc for its baby powder and body powder products warned as early as 2006, that talc may increase the risk of ovarian cancer in women, but this warning never made it to the talcum powder label.

Talcum powder products like Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower To Shower have been around for over a century. When did Johnson and Johnson know that their products could cause ovarian cancer. Why did they let you use it for years. But, even more importantly, how dare they market it for use “down there” when they knw it could cause ovarian cancer.

If you or a family member used these products for years to keep dry, you must join other families and woman who are filing Talcum Powder ovarian cancer lawsuits. This product must be removed from the shelves or a clear warning be put on it.

 

 

Ovarian Cancer? Is Talcum Powder The New Culprit?

Cervical, Ovarian, Uterine, Vaginal, Vulvar cancer are various types of gynecological cancers women must be made aware of. You must understand your risk factors and the various products on the market that can potentially cause these types of cancer. These cannot be ignored nor can the potential risk of your having used talcum powder for years.
Recently Johnson and Johnson paid  72 million dollars  to a woman’s family after she passed away from ovarian cancer. The jury accepted the claim that the  woman’s use of talcum powder products for feminine hygiene caused for her ovarian cancer and  eventual death. There are no warning  labels on Johnson and Johnson’s Baby Powder or Shower to Shower that their  these products may be harmful to women if used this way.
This is not a new idea but women have been shocked and are frightened now. If you feel ashamed talking about your private parts then realize these manufacturers used your fear of not smelling fresh to sell this product and  never told you about the ovarian cancer risk.  It has been reported that over 98,000 women have been  diagnosed with gynecologic cancers last year. Many of these were due to ovarian cancer and we do not know how many of them used the “stay dry” talcum powder marketed to them.

Do you still use talcum powder for personal hygiene?  How many other products do you use that you have no clue may harm you? The manufacturers certainly did not fess up and you obviously cannot trust them to tell you.
After the Johnson and Johnson fiasco I realized how many dangerous drugs and devices that are massive lawsuits have targeted women. We speak to women every day about the potential risk of using talcum powder and people who have lost a loved one to ovarian cancer and now realize their mother, sister grandmother, wife or loved one used these products right where the particles can travel to the ovaries.

The more I  speak with callers about their ovarian cancer and their use of talcum powder products the more I realize how careful we must be and how glad I am my mother pushed old fashioned corn starch. It was also alot cheaper in those days. But, J & J found a great market to go after. The black and Hispanic women who wanted to fit into a white society and smell clean and nice became the ultimate target.  They knew  that choosing their product, if marketed correctly, had very little to do with awareness of cancer  health, and  totally due to  fear of not smelling like a pretty white princess  all day and  every day.

Black woman often  used talcum powder  for her  their entire adult life. These products seemed safe, after all, mothers used talcum powder on their babies, right? Using Talcum Powder products were a part of being in with the other girls. Yet, as far back as 2005 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center did a study  about these products. Another study   was published in 1997. The studies suggested  there might  be a connection between talcum powder use  and ovarian cancer.
Now we learn the truth thru Talcum Powder Lawsuit  TV lawyer ads.
Is there is a  connection between feminine hygiene powders and ovarian cancer? It seems that biopsies are finding talc particles in the ovaries and these particles may have been there for years. It has been noted that the constant irritation can lead to cancer producing cells. The news is out now. The Johnson and Johnson lawsuit has awakened women  across the  country. They are calling us everyday and the families that lost them to ovarian cancer are calling as well. Do you believe your ovarian cancer diagnosis is from your use of Talcum Powder? Did you lose a loved one to ovarian cancer? Did she use talcum powder daily to keep dry? Do you want to join others in the Talcum Powder lawsuit and send a message to get those bad products off the shelves? Call the Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline..

Talc, Talcum Powder , Baby Powder Lawyers For Ovarian Cancer

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline has a Network of Talc, Talcum Powder and Baby Powder lawyers. The helpline is receiving calls from woman on a daily basis between the ages of 40 and 66.  It  becomes apparent that the current  surge in ovarian cancer fit  in the exact  age groups of thousands of women who used Talcum Powder on a daily basis in the 60’s – 80’s. It also becomes apparent that the J & J focus on the Hispanic and Afro American community in their marketing can be seen in the numbers of women with an ovarian cancer diagnosis.

The  Ovarian Cancer Age Statistics
Ovarian cancer rates are highest in women aged 55-64 years. The median age at which women are diagnosed is 63, meaning that half of women are younger than 63 when diagnosed with ovarian cancer and half are older.

Explore The History

In the 1990s Johnson and Johnson increased   marketing to African-American and Hispanic women. Studies show a 44 person increased risk for epithelial ovarian cancer with genital talc use among African-American women.  Imerys Talc America, the supplier of talc to Johnson and Johnson, has carried a warning label against genital use on its 2,000-pound supply bags since 2006.

About Talc

Talc is  a mineral substance that’s either mined or produced. It  is used in different  cosmetic and beauty products. It can be found in baby powders.  It can sometimes be contaminated with asbestos. There are many company’s now manufacturing talc free products for a reason.  Even Johnson & Johnson  has been manufacturing new ” safe”  products with cornstarch, silk powders, and finely milled oats.

Symptoms Of  Ovarian Cancer

Abdominal distension
Urinary frequency
Abdominal pain
Postmenopausal bleeding
Loss of appetite
Rectal bleeding
Abdominal bloating

If you or a family member now has a diagnosis of ovarian cancer and used Baby Powder, Talcum Powder or Talc Powder on a daily basis contact the Talcum Powder Helpline.

Latest Research on Ovarian Cancer

The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline is more then just a network of experienced Talcum Powder Lawsuit Attorneys. We offer ovarian cancer resources and updates that are found online. Below you will find some of the latest research on ovarian cancer. It is now known, that the manufacturers knew that there was a potential link between ovarian cancer and the use of Talcum Powder and Baby Powder. The jury knew it when they gave the family of a talcum powder- ovarian cancer victim $72 million.

We found this page on the latest research and offer it to our followers. We hope this helps.

Ovarian Cancer – Latest Research
Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board, 04/2015

Doctors are working to learn more about ovarian cancer, ways to prevent it, how to best treat it, and how to provide the best care to people diagnosed with this disease. The following areas of research may include new options for patients through clinical trials. Always talk with your doctor about the diagnostic and treatment options best for you.

Screening For Ovarian Cancer

There are no currently effective screening methods for the general population. A screening method that estimates a woman’s risk of ovarian cancer by using her age and the results of a yearly CA-125 blood test holds promise for detecting early-stage ovarian cancer. An international study is looking into the role of serial CA-125 screening for ovarian cancer. As explained in Diagnosis, CA-125 is a substance called a tumor marker that is found in higher levels in women with ovarian cancer.

In 2012, the U.S Preventative Services Task Force released a statement saying that for the general population of women with no symptoms, screening for ovarian cancer is not helpful and may lead to harm. However, women at high risk for ovarian cancer due to family history or with a BRCA mutation(s) (see Risk Factors) are recommended to have screening with CA-125 blood tests and transvaginal ultrasound. This approach has not been proven to improve survival or detect cancers at an earlier and more curable stage.

Targeted Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

Targeted therapy is a treatment that targets the cancer’s specific genes, proteins, or the tissue environment that contributes to cancer growth and survival.

Some targeted therapy is directed towards specific genes that might be found with abnormalities in certain types of epithelial ovarian cancer. For this purpose, ovarian cancer is divided into two groups:  type I and type II.  Type II cancers are the more typical high grade serous cancers, for which standard chemotherapy has been most effective. These tumors typically are diagnosed at later stages and have mutations in TP53 and BRCA genes in the tumor.  Other mutations are rarely seen.

The BRCA mutation, even if only found in the tumor and not in the blood, may increase the effectiveness of a certain classes of drugs such as PARP inhibitors (see below).  Type I tumors include the more rare types of ovarian cancer including low grade serous, endometrioid, clear cell, and mucinous cancers.  These tumors have a variety of mutations including KRAS, BRAF, PI3KCA and PTEN, which have implications for targeted treatment. Clinical trials in these groups are ongoing.

Anti-Angiogenesis Inhibitors For Ovarian Cancer

Drugs called anti-angiogenesis inhibitors block the action of a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). These drugs have been shown to increase the cancer’s response to treatment and delay the time it takes for the cancer to return. VEGF promotes angiogenesis, which is the formation of new blood vessels. Because a tumor needs nutrients delivered by blood vessels to grow and spread, the goal of anti-angiogensis therapies is to “starve” the tumor. Bevacizumab (Avastin), an antibody which binds VEGF and prevents it from being active, has been shown to be effective in ovarian cancer.  FDA approval was recently given in the United States for its use in combination with selected chemotherapy for patients with platinum resistant recurrence.
PARP Inhibitors For Ovarian Cancer

Another class of drugs, called PARP inhibitors, are being evaluated for ovarian cancer.  These drugs act on DNA repair in cancer cells, making it difficult for them to replicate.  The BRCA genes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) are also normally involved in DNA repair, and a mutation in these genes interfere with this pathway function.  PARP inhibitors make it particularly difficult for cells that otherwise have a BRCA mutation to grow and divide.

The PARP inhibitor olaparib (Lynparza) has received FDA approval in the United States for recurrent disease in patients who have the inherited BRCA mutation and who have received three or more lines of chemotherapy.  In the supporting study of 137 patients with a BRCA mutation, 34% of patients experienced shrinkage in tumor for an average of 7.9 months. A very small number of patients developed secondary hematologic (blood) cancers after use of these drugs. Studies are currently underway with other PARP inhibitors, which do not all require the inherited BRCA mutation. These are being tested to see if they can keep the cancer from coming back after chemotherapy. The potential benefits and risks of PARP therapy should be discussed with your doctor.
Many other new targeted treatments are also now in clinical trials. Increasingly, doctors are learning about each patient’s individual tumor’s biology through direct molecular testing. This information may be useful in matching patients with a clinical trial for a specific targeted therapy.  Learn more about the basics of targeted therapy.

Immunotherapy For Ovarian Cancer

Immunotherapy is usually designed to boost the body’s natural defenses to fight the cancer. It uses materials made either by the body or in a laboratory to bolster, target, or restore immune system function. Researchers are currently examining whether drugs called checkpoint inhibitors may boost the immune system’s ability to destroy cancer cells.  Examples of these drugs target CTLA4 or PD-1 and have recently been shown to cause shrinkage in other cancer types such as melanoma, as well as having some activity in patients with ovarian cancer.

Cancer vaccines are another type of immunotherapy currently being tested for ovarian cancer.  In addition, some approaches called “adoptive cell therapy” take killer T cells found as part of the immune system in an individual patient and grow them in the laboratory, train them to attack certain targets such as MUC 16 (CA125) that is found on any ovarian cancer cells, and them give them back intravenously to the patient.  This approach has been tried in patients with hematologic cancers using other targets with some early success, and clinical trials are now opening for ovarian cancer.  Learn more about the basics of immunotherapy.

Hormone Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

Research is underway about the role of estrogen, androgens, and other hormones in ovarian cancer treatment. For treatment of recurrent or later-stage ovarian cancer,  the use of tamoxifen (Nolvadex, Soltamax), aromatase inhibitors, and enzalutamide (Xtandi), a blocker of the androgen receptor, is being considered.

Gene Therapy For Ovarian Cancer

One new area of research is discovering how damaged genes in ovarian cancer cells can be corrected or replaced. Researchers are studying the use of specially designed viruses that carry normal genes into the core of cancer cells and then replace the defective genes with the functional ones.

Supportive Care For Ovarian Cancer

Clinical trials are underway to find better ways of reducing symptoms and side effects of current ovarian cancer treatments, in order to improve a woman’s comfort and quality of life.

We will continue to search the net for ovarian cancer  information to help our clients. Our goal is to offer information that may help

 

What Is Talcum Powder?

What is Talcum Powder?
Talcum powder is made from talc, a mineral made up mainly of the elements magnesium, silicon, and oxygen. As a powder, it absorbs moisture well and helps cut down on friction, making it useful for keeping skin dry and helping to prevent rashes. It is widely used in cosmetic products such as baby powder and adult body and facial powders, as well as in a number of other consumer products.

In its natural form, some talc contains asbestos, a substance known to cause cancers in and around the lungs when inhaled (see our document Asbestos). All talcum products used in homes in the United States have been asbestos-free since the 1970s.

Talc, from which talcum powder is developed has been used by women to dry off in the pelvic area on a daily basis. New research links talc to ovarian cancer, and women are  filing Talcum Powder lawsuits against the manufacturers.

Who would believe it. Johnson and Johnson baby talcum  powder lawsuits for ovarian cancer. Yes it is true.  Contact the Talcum Powder-Ovarian Cancer Lawsuit Helpline today.

Talcum Powder – Ovarian Cancer Link Alert

Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline  alerts women who didn’t know of the possible link between   Talcum powder product use  on the pelvic area and ovarian cancer. Talcum powder lawyers claim that if talcum powder is used for years the particles can travel to the fallopian tubes and the ovaries. They can stay there for years and cause irritation which eventually can result in cancer cells. Ovarian cancer rates are highest in women aged 55-64 years. This is the exact age group that Talcum powder was marketed to when they were  teenagers and young women.

Johnson & Johnson is now  facing more than 1,000 lawsuits from women claiming they  knew that the talc in its Baby Powder and Shower to Shower products was linked to ovarian cancer when used in the genital area. They did not warn anyone of this. Both products were marketed extensively  for feminine hygiene. . A 1988 ad for Shower to Shower said “just a sprinkle a day keeps odor away.” Others told women: “Your body perspires in more places than just under your arms.”

Is Talcum Powder  Johnson and Johnson’s next horror for women?  1000’s of women are still suffering from their vaginal mesh products. The Talcum Powder Lawsuit Helpline receives dozens of calls every day from women who feel their ovarian cancer is from use of these Talcum Powder products. Juries have started to award female victims and families who have lost loved ones compensation.

What Are The Symptoms Of Ovarian Cancer?

Pain in the pelvis or abdomen
Bloating in the abdomen
Urinary urgency
Urinary frequency
Constipation or diarrhea
Feeling full quickly while eating
Having difficulty eating
Vaginal bleeding or other discharge that is different than normal
Back pain
If you have any of these symptoms, talk to your doctor.

What Is Talcum Powder?

Talcum powder is made from talc or   hydrated magnesium silicate which occurs naturally as a mineral in formations like soapstone. For over 120 years, Johnson & Johnson has marketed talcum powder around the world as a baby powder and for adults to absorb sweat in products like Shower to Shower.

Johnson and Johnson has  targeted women to increase sales. “Want to feel cool, smooth and dry? It’s as easy as taking powder from a baby,” was the text in a  Johnson & Johnson ad from the 1960s.

In the 1970s, the first studies emerged showing that talc was deeply embedded into ovarian cancers. Johnson & Johnson introduced corn starch alternatives but it continued to offer talc-based products. In 2014 Johnson & Johnson’s annual talcum powder sales were estimated at $374 million.

The Research Is In On Talcum Powder

The World Health Organization reports that talc is “possibly carcinogenic to humans.” Talc is banned in Europe.

If you believe your diagnosis of ovarian cancer is due to use of Johnson’s Baby Powder or Shower To Shower speak to one of our Talcum powder lawyers.

Spread The Word On Talcum Powder Lawsuits and Dangers

Do you know someone who has ovarian cancer. Tell them about the dangers of Talcum powder.

FDA’s Responsibility In Monitoring Talcum Powder Products

Talcum Powder- Baby Powder  lawyers  discuss FDA and Talcum Powder Warnings

Could The FDA issued a warning regarding Talcum Powder and the link to ovarian cancer?

The Maharashtra state Food and Drug Administration has  collected Johnson’s and Johnson’s baby powder samples for lab testing. This action was taken after taking a cue from the death of a 62-year-old woman in America, which is believed to be due to sustained use of Johnson & Johnson’s baby powder. She passed away due to ovarian cancer.

The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has given J & J a notice  following a U.S. court’s verdict that awarded $72 million to a 62-year-old woman’s family after she died of cancer due to prolonged use of the company’s talcum powder.

The The Maharashtra Food and Drug Administration- FDA has collected samples of Shower to Shower, Dermicool, Ponds and Nycil talcum powder brands besides J&J from across Maharashtra and sent them to the laboratory to check if they follow the rules laid down under the Drug and Cosmetic Act.

The FDA In The United States

What Is The FDA’s authority over cosmetic safety
Under the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), cosmetic products and ingredients, with the exception of color additives, do not have to undergo FDA review or approval before they go on the market. Cosmetics must be properly labeled, and they must be safe for use by consumers under labeled or customary conditions of use. Cosmetic companies have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients, but the law does not require them to share their safety information with FDA.

FDA monitors for potential safety problems with cosmetic products on the market and takes action when needed to protect public health. Before we can take such action against a cosmetic, we need sound scientific data to show that it is harmful under its intended use.

Talc: What it is and how it is used in cosmetics
Talc is a naturally occurring mineral, mined from the earth, composed of magnesium, silicon, oxygen, and hydrogen. Chemically, talc is a hydrous magnesium silicate with a chemical formula of Mg3Si4O10(OH)2.

Talc has many uses in cosmetics and other personal care products; in food, such as rice and chewing gum; and in the manufacture of tablets. For example, it may be used to absorb moisture, to prevent caking, to make facial makeup opaque, or to improve the feel of a product.

Asbestos: What it is, why it’s a concern, and how to prevent its occurrence in cosmetics
Asbestos is also a naturally occurring silicate mineral, but with a different crystal structure. Both talc and asbestos are naturally occurring minerals that may be found in close proximity in the earth. Unlike talc, however, asbestos is a known carcinogen. For this reason, FDA considers it unacceptable for cosmetic talc to be contaminated with asbestos.

However the FDA has not issued any warnings regarding talc or talcum powder and despite the research showing that there may be a link between talcum powder and ovarian cancer, the Food and Drug Administration is taking no action.

There has been studies  going back to the 1960s that  suggest a possible link between the use of powders containing talc and the incidence of ovarian cancer.  Questions about the potential contamination of talc with asbestos have been raised since the 1970s.

To prevent contamination of talc with asbestos, it is essential to select talc mining sites carefully and take steps to purify the ore sufficiently.

How FDA followed up on the latest reports
Because safety questions about the possible presence of asbestos in talc are raised periodically, FDA decided to conduct an exploratory survey of currently marketed cosmetic-grade raw material talc, as well as some cosmetic products containing talc.

Because FDA’s cosmetic laboratories do not have the equipment needed to perform the analyses, we searched for a qualified outside laboratory to do the work. We contracted with AMA Analytical Services, Inc. (AMA) of Lanham, MD to conduct this laboratory survey, based on demonstrated experience with asbestos analysis in complex matrices, appropriate facilities, equipment, personnel, analytical strategy, and budget criteria. The study ran from September 28, 2009 to September 27, 2010.

How the survey was conducted
The first step was to identify cosmetic talc suppliers and talc-containing cosmetic products. We found seven talc suppliers identified in the 2008 edition of the International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook and two more by searching online. The contract laboratory contacted each supplier to request samples of its talc. Of the nine suppliers identified, four complied with the request.

We found talc-containing cosmetic products to analyze by visiting various retail outlets in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area. The samples identified for testing included low, medium, and high priced products, along with some from “niche” markets, in order to cover as broad a product range as possible. A total of thirty-four cosmetic products containing talc were selected, including eye shadow, blush, foundation, face powder, and body powder. All cosmetic products were purchased from retail stores in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area.

The contract laboratory analyzed the samples using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods published by the New York State Department of Health, Environmental Laboratory Approval Program. Each sample was analyzed three times using both methods.

The results of FDA’s survey and what they mean
The survey found no asbestos fibers or structures in any of the samples of cosmetic-grade raw material talc or cosmetic products containing talc. The results were limited, however, by the fact that only four talc suppliers submitted samples and by the number of products tested. For these reasons, while FDA finds these results informative, they do not prove that most or all talc or talc-containing cosmetic products currently marketed in the United States are likely to be free of asbestos contamination. “As always, when potential public health concerns are raised, we will continue to monitor for new information and take appropriate actions to protect the public health.”